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School Support For Student with Helmet Anxiety

Topic: 

Hi folks!

I'm a school psychologist in Huntington Beach, CA looking for ideas to support one of my high school students who has anxiety regarding her helmet. She has not had to wear it yet because it keeps getting refitted; however, she shared with me that she has soul-crushing anxiety about wearing the helmet at school (really, in public). Not so much in her classes, because she feels confident that her classmates will support her. It's really break and lunch that frightens her. I want to organize something for her with our ASB students to show her that she is valued and loved by her fellow students. Does anyone have previous experience with this issue? I'd love to hear your stories and ideas. We care very much about this young lady and just want to show her that she is supported.

Comments

I am not a psychologist or an

I am not a psychologist or an expert on epilepsy, but I was once a teenager and have raised several children throughout their teenage years. Kids can be kind and cruel as we all know. They are cruel when they see something unusual like seeing a teenager wearing a helmet in school. They can be kind when then know the girl and understand her story. Oh she has epilepsy. If she falls she could really injure herself. People wear helmets on their bikes so they don't injure themselves. How about having a school assembly about epilepsy. I am reading an English book called "I Smell Burning" written by a black English doctor telling the story of his brother who dies eventually from an epileptic fit and also a general history of epilepsy. In the past epileptics were terribly discriminated against since they were considered being little more than insane. The famous poet Emily Dickinson has been identified as a potential epilepsy victim. This was one of the explanations why she almost never left her room during her life. The social stigma was too great. George V, the recent English king, had one of his sons exiled for life to a castle in Scotland because of the shame. Gladly things have improved tremendously and while most people do not know much about the condition, they are also not likely to condemn epileptics today either.I was fascinated to learn about all of the famous people with epilepsy. Julius Caesar, He collapsed during a battle. The authors Fyodor Dostoevsky and Charles Dickens. Musicians Neil Young and Prince. Black Olympic gold medalist Florence Griffith Joyner. She died from a seizure. The President Theodore Roosevelt - one of the most active of any of the Presidents. There is nothing like being associated with famous people to make something seem less important. Maybe even cool. I would suggest that either you or the student should give the presentation - if she was up to it. At the least she could be introduced and put on her helmet so that everyone can see and understand. I think life would be much happier for her in the future if everyone was a part of it. Good luck and best wishes.

it’s great that she has

it’s great that she has teachers that care for here and acknowledge her situation. i applaud you for that. i never had to wear a helmet. i do not have gran male seizures but i did go through bullying from teachers & students. so my advice is just continue doing what you’re doing. 

I remember when I was in high

I remember when I was in high school, I played club soccer until..... my mom decided I would have to wear a helmet during it all. Embarrassed the crap out of me. Told her that I shouldn't have to do it. If I had to, at least my brother should. Maybe you could get ASB to wear helmets one day to encourage it.

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