Strive to #AimForZero Seizures

The Epilepsy Foundation wants people with epilepsy to know that “No seizures, no side effects” should be the ultimate goal of epilepsy treatment.

Unfortunately, too many people with epilepsy whose seizures can be controlled accept continued seizures in their life — and may be unaware of potential strategies to prevent them.

The Epilepsy Foundation believes that even one seizure is not acceptable and is taking steps through research and the development of new therapies to work toward no seizures for all people living with epilepsy.

For most people living with epilepsy today, the disease can be controlled with available therapies and good seizure-management practices including the support of an epilepsy specialist.

And for people with the most severe types of difficult to control epilepsy, there are steps an individual can take to lower one’s risk, including participating in research to find new, more effective therapies.

New Treatments and Therapies in a Timeframe that Matters

One of the Epilepsy Foundation's key strategic priorities is to accelerate new therapies for people with epilepsy and seizures in a timeframe that matters.

One example of this is the Rare Epilepsy Network, which unites 26 rare epilepsy organizations, Epilepsy Foundation, Research Triangle Institute, Columbia University, and New York University to expedite research into the rare epilepsies.

Another example of our commitment to preventing seizures and sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is the SUDEP Challenge Initiative, which will be awarding more than $1 million for a series of prize challenge competitions around predicting and preventing SUDEP.

What You Can Do

Regardless of a person’s current level of seizure control, there are many proactive steps people with epilepsy can take once they have committed to exploring all options to stop seizures. These include:

These steps will help most people living with seizures improve seizure control and quality of life.

The one third of people living with persistent seizures even with existing therapies and already following these seizure management practices may want to consider participating in medical research that can lead to effective treatments. Learn more about epilepsy clinical trials and research.

Strive to #AimForZero Seizures
Authored by: The Epilepsy Foundation SUDEP Institute on 9/2016
Jacqueline French
Expert Insight

What are the keys to reducing SUDEP risk?

"The best way to reduce the risk of SUDEP is to get seizures under control, particularly the seizures that are most likely to be associated with SUDEP, namely generalized tonic-clonic seizures. If seizures are not controlled, it is important to seek specialized care. Epilepsy specialists often can increase the likelihood of seizure freedom using medication, surgery, or devices. People can also decrease their personal risk of SUDEP by taking their medications and not missing doses, since missed doses can lead to breakthrough seizures, which can be very dangerous."

— Jacqueline French, MD, Chief Scientific Officer for the Epilepsy Foundation and Professor of Neurology at New York University.