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Lorazepam is a medicine approved by the Food and Drug Administration to treat all types of seizures, including absence, myoclonic, atonic (drop attacks), partial seizures and seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.

  • It is most often used together with another antiepileptic drug. It is also used in emergency situations involving seizures. It may also be used for other conditions as well as seizures, such as anxiety.
  • The drug is quickly absorbed after taking it by mouth and it reaches its highest amount in the body in 1-2 hours.
Ativan
Tablet
0.5mg Ativan

0.5 mg Ativan

 1mg Ativan

1 mg Ativan

2mg Ativan

2 mg Ativan

1mg lorazepam

1 mg lorazepam

Used to Treat

  • Benign Rolandic Epilepsy
  • Childhood and Juvenile Absence Epilepsy
  • Dravet Syndrome
  • Hypothalamic Hamartoma
  • Infantile Spasms/West’s Syndrome
  • Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy
  • Landau-Kleffner Syndrome
  • Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome
  • Rasmussen’s Syndrome
  • Ring Chromosome 20 Syndrome
  • Reflex Epilepsies
  • Temporal Lobe Epilepsy
  • Absence Seizures
  • Atonic Seizures
  • Atypical Absence Seizures
  • Clonic Seizures
  • Complex Partial Seizures
  • Febrile Seizures
  • Myoclonic Seizures
  • Refractory Seizures
  • Secondarily Generalized Seizures
  • Simple Partial Seizures
  • Tonic Seizures
  • Tonic-clonic Seizures

Forms

There are several brands and generic forms of the medicine. The brand name Ativan is shown below at the 0.5 mg pill, the 1 mg pill and the 2 mg pill and the generic form lorazepam at 1 mg pill is also shown.

How to take and store Lorazepam?

To use the tablet form: chew tablets and swallow or swallow the tablet whole. This can be taken with or without food. Drink a small glass of water or liquid to wash down any leftover medicine.

It’s important that this medicine is taken regularly or it won’t work right. Don’t skip doses even if you feel that you don’t need the drug.

Sometimes when a person takes this medicine long-term or in large amounts, their body may get used to this drug making the drug less effective or helpful. In most patients, lorazepam is usually prescribed for a period of 4-6 months, though at times your doctor may decide to keep you on the medication for a longer period of time. You should never stop taking this medication without talking to your doctor. Stopping the drug suddenly can worsen your condition and cause withdrawal symptoms including irritability, sleeplessness, nervousness, and seizures. Your doctor will need to decrease your dose gradually. Keep this medicine in its original container tightly closed and out of reach of children. Store your prescription at room temperature, away from excess heat and moisture (i.e. not the bathroom). Throw away any medication that is outdated or no longer needed.

What if I forget?

Take the missed dose as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and continue your regular dosing schedule. Do not take an extra dose unless prescribed by your doctor.

What are the most common side effects of Lorazepam?

Common side-effects include poor coordination, behavior changes, unsteadiness, sleepiness, fatigue, drowsiness, blurred or double-vision, and dizziness.

What are the most serious side effects of Lorazepam?

Various side-effects may occur in taking this medication. Most side-effects are not serious and may disappear naturally. Call your doctor if you have any questions concerning your possible side effects. However, do not stop taking your medication without advice from your doctor. Contact your physician immediate if you experience any of the following side-effects:

  • Allergic reactions (rashes, hives, difficulty breathing, swallowing)
  • Aggressive behavior
  • Suicidal thoughts
  • Chest congestion
  • Hallucinations
  • Memory loss
  • Shortness of breath
  • Tremors
If a woman takes Lorazepam during pregnancy will it hurt the baby?

Just for women:
Women who are taking this medication who wish to become pregnant should discuss treatment options with their physician before becoming pregnant. Lorazepam passes into breast milk and it is not known whether the medication will affect the nursing infant. Do not take Lorazepam without first talking to your doctor if you are breast feeding a baby.

Does this medication affect birth control pills?
This medication is not known to have any drug interactions with birth control pills.

Will the medicine affect my menstrual cycle?
This medicine should not affect the menstrual cycle. If your cycle becomes irregular, call your doctor.

Read the package insert of Lorazepam

In the United States, companies that manufacture medicines are required to publish certain kinds of information about each product. This document is commonly known as a “package insert” because it is usually included with each package of the medicine.

You can also read these documents (also called "prescribing information") online. The U.S. package insert for Ativan (lorazepam) is found at:

Some of the information may differ in other countries.

To learn how to read and understand a package insert, see How to read a package insert.