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Updated: 04/12/2022

Device Description

NINscan-SE is a multi-modal physiological recording system originally developed for NASA. It has been demonstrated for use in brain monitoring and imaging, ambulatory/exercise settings, polysomnography, first responder physiological monitoring, and during football tackling, among other applications. The wide range of physiological sensors on a robust, mobile platform has strong potential to be combined with machine learning algorithms to improve seizure detection and warning capabilities for epilepsy patients.

Company or Institution

Massachusetts General Hospital / Harvard Medical school

Team Description

Neural Systems Group at MGH

Monitoring Categories

Accelerometer
EDA
EEG
EKG
EMG
Other
Respiration
Self-Report
Sleep Quality
Temperature

Monitoring Categories Description

In addition to the above, cuffless blood pressure & cerebral hemodynamics

How is the device worn?

External Wearable

Body Placement

Depends on which sensors are deployed, but the box is typically in a pocket with sensors on the head

How is data transmitted?

SD memory card, Bluetooth

How is data stored?

How is data from the device stored (e.g., cloud storage)?

SD memory card, transferred to computer

Device Action

Other

Device Action Description

Currently set up for recording only; alerts for wearer are possible

Development Stage

Developing Prototype
Preclinical Testing

Publications

Yes

Looking for Collaborations

Yes

List of Publications

Primary publications: Strangman GE, Ivkovic V, Zhang Q. Wearable brain imaging with multimodal physiological monitoring. J Appl Physiol (1985). 2018;124(3):564-72. Epub 2017/07/15. doi: 10.1152/japplphysiol.00297.2017. PubMed PMID: 28705994. Hu G, Zhang Q, Ivkovic V, Strangman GE. Ambulatory diffuse optical tomography and multimodality physiological monitoring system for muscle and exercise applications. J Biomed Opt. 2016;21(9):091314. doi: 10.1117/1.JBO.21.9.091314. PubMed PMID: 27467190.

Is the device inter operable with other devices?

Yes

Does the device have a time stamping component?

Yes

Point of Contact

Gary Strangman, strang@mgh.harvard.edu

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