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Recent Episode

Hi all! New here. I have been diagnosed with epilepsy for about 14 years now (im 35). I initially was seen having grand mals. I was on carbamazepine for 13 years when i was advised to change over to lamotrigine as its safer for me getting older. I made the official change in November 2019. Only issues I have had are complex partials once or twice a month, but usually short and just zone out for a minute or 2. I have come to realize these are all related to my menstrual cycle (i connected these dots over the years when inital Neurologists missed). Well yesterday I had the most stressful day at work, had 2 complex partial seizures in one day. I was on my menstrual cycle. As soon as I logged off my computer, I must have blacked out. It must have happened for a 20 to 25 min span, and all I remember was walking from room to room for someone in my house and scared and so confused. This was the first time since on new meds. My Neurologist is in the process of moving offices, so my message to her was not received by correct office. Anyways, I am super worried about this since my grand mal seizures have been so controlled and non existent. I am thinking this could be from stress? New medication perhaps? I was given my license back within the first year I was initially diagnosed but not going to lie, I feel really concerned getting back in a vehicle. Im reaching out in hopes maybe someone has had something somewhat similar, maybe a similar experience during a medication change?

Comments

Hi, Thank you for sharing

Hi, Thank you for sharing your story and we understand your concerns. Your safety, as well as the safety of others, is most important. Talk with your neurologist about your concerns regarding driving, to help determine what is best and safest for you. We cannot determine if your most recent seizure is related to your change in medication, hormones or stress levels. It’s important that you're following up with your doctor to explore this further and if you continue to experience any changes in seizure types/frequency, side effects, behaviors,moods or symptoms, to help determine what individual treatment plan is best for you. To learn more about Lamotrigine and potential side effects, visit: https://www.epilepsy.com/medications/lamotrigine It’s also important that you’repaying attention to how stress and your menstrual cycle is impacting your overall health and epilepsy. Stress is a commonly reported triggers for those living with epilepsy. https://www.epilepsy.com/learn/triggers-seizures/stress-and-epilepsy And about out half of women living epilepsy report having more seizures around the time of their menstrual period: https://www.epilepsy.com/learn/triggers-seizures/menstruation Explore our section on women and epilepsy to learn more about catamenial epilepsy, (referring seizure frequency intensifying during certain phases of the menstrual cycle) and for questions to review with your neurologist, here:https://www.epilepsy.com/living-epilepsy/women/young-women/menstruation You may want to consider keeping a journal or diary. My Seizure Diary: https://www.epilepsy.com/living-epilepsy/epilepsy-foundation-my-seizure-... great tool for identifying & tracking seizures and triggers, setting reminders, managing medications & side effects, recording medical history, moods, behaviors, and other personal experiences, that may affect seizures and wellness, which can be shared with your healthcare team. Additionally,you may always contact our 24/7 Helpline, where trained information specialists are available to answer your questions, offer help, hope, support, guidance, and access to national and local resources.1-800-332-1000,or contactus@efa.org. epilepsy.com/helpline

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