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tv and seizures, resuming seizure triggering activiies

Does anyone have seizures associated with watching television?? I don't watch a lot of tv, but when I'm feeling unmotivated to do anything, I will turn it on. While I have certainly watched tv with no seizures, about 15-25% of the time I do, and when I do I have one within seconds to 30 min. of watching. Time of day doesn't matter. In the evenings I haven't noticed as specific a pattern, but I do typically have seizures in bed at night just before or after I fall asleep anyway (whether or not I've watched tv). Is tv a common trigger? Is 15-25% association between a seizure and a possible trigger enough to identify it as a trigger, or should this % be closer to 100%??

I would hate to give up my tv, esp. because I like video games (I have a PS3). I haven't played a lot of games lately, because I'm in a stage where my medication is affecting my concentration, so I'm not yet sure if video games are a trigger.

I'm hoping responders are going to say 'no, tv is not commonly a seizure trigger, so don't worry about it, but speaking medication: Let's say someone's seizures are under control with medications. If that same someone has identified a particular trigger for some of their seizures, now that their seizures are know to be effectively under controlled in all other situations, can they safely and effectively resume that triggering activity?? (I REALLY hope this makes sense. I've spent the last 10 minutes trying to reword it so it does-lol)

Comments

Does anyone have seizures associated with watching television? Most likely, people who have been diagnosed with, or people who may eventually become diagnosed with, Occipital Lobe Epilepsy, because the individual's seizure focus or seizure spot would be located in the Occipital Lobe region of the brain.

Bruce (I'm not a doctor, but instead, an epilepsy support group leader, epilepsy advocate, who has epilepsy.)

I wish I could say I was diagnosed - with some seizure focus, somewhere! I am still awaiting an appointment with a "more experienced" neurologist, and won't get in until Dec.

I have spots blinking that get larger and when I was younger watching cartoons.  I would get sick with the spots, I would be out.  I then found out I had seizures.  The EEG focus was right at the line of the occipital and temporal lobe.  The temporal lobe has what is called the visual field which are fine strans that go to the occipital lobe. Occipital Lobe is important for sight.  Neurology is a tangaly web only a Neurologist or Epileptologist can explain.  I have had 2 brain surgeries. 

I am sensitive to TV at times, sometimes music too.  There can be many causes and I will let the professionals tell us the reasons why.  Once my medications are fine.  I have eaten my vegetables and fruits, exercised appropriately. I have worked 15 years in research.  It really is a mixed web of knowledge.  A fancy MRI found out the cause of my seizures which I have had for 40 years.

 I noted you just have to keep things in balance and no matter what your health situation is.   Having the experience of raising a family.  To much of TV for one child is mesmerizing, the computer can be also mesmerizing too.  I wish you the best.

I think what you're suffering from is Photosensitive Epilepsy.

If you have photosensitive epilepsy, certain types of flickering or flashing light may incite a seizure.  The trigger could be exposure to television screens due to the flicker or rolling images, computer monitors, certain video games or TV broadcasts containing rapid flashes, even alternating patterns of different colors, in addition to intense strobe lights.

And surprisingly, seizures may be triggered by natural light, such as sunlight, especially when shimmering off water, even sun flickering through trees or through the slats of Venetian blinds.

I'm sorry for the bad news...about the TV and video games...    Phylis Feiner Johnson   www.epilepsytalk.com

          I watch 6 hours of tv per night usually, and its more the repetetive sounds that effect, or trigger seizures. Light doesn't cause, or pose much of a problem, but when those certain certain types of sounds come on they can get one started. I am going to continue watching television, since there not much else to do in the evening hours.

 

                                                                                  Good luck with evertything,

                                                                                  Joe :)

                                                                               

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