Community Forum Archive

Teenager Problems....

Hey Everyone, I'm 16 in 23 days, and I have absence and grand mal siezures. I want to be an awesome person and i think i am... But it seems like every time someone new finds out i'm epileptic they kinda get scared... Does this happen to anyone else?? And being a healthy almost-16y/o that loves to experiment with teenage things, i'm havin a great time "experimenting" with boys. I know, i know, "im too young, im just a silly emotional teenger." but its not like im having sex or snything.. But guys get scared after they find out im epileptic. It sucks.... I want to hae fun like every other girl my age but none of the guys ive had fun with get passed my epilepsy. But the funny thng is, ive never even had a siezure in front of any guy! All at home by myself or with my fam. K i know this makes me sound kind of stupid, but im not. Just struggling a little bit. Any advice?

Comments

Re: Teenager Problems....

Submitted by wmgmather on Thu, 2012-05-17 - 13:21

I don't know if this will help.  I'm a parent with epilepsy.  When my daughter, saw me having my first seizure she was scared. My husband had to tell her what happened because she was a young child.  She has friends who come over all the time.  If I have one with them over, I have complex partial seizures, she expalins to them what is happening.  Your not sounding stupid.

If your parents know any of their parents, then they can talk with their kids what to look for, especially the grand mal ones. 

This might help as well, even though the school year is coming to an end. Maybe the principal will have an assembly where the school nurse or someone else what to look for if somebody in school as a seizure.  Most kids in school don't know what to do if they see someone who has a seizure or what the side effects are.  Just run it by your parents and see what they think of the idea.

I don't know if this will help.  I'm a parent with epilepsy.  When my daughter, saw me having my first seizure she was scared. My husband had to tell her what happened because she was a young child.  She has friends who come over all the time.  If I have one with them over, I have complex partial seizures, she expalins to them what is happening.  Your not sounding stupid.

If your parents know any of their parents, then they can talk with their kids what to look for, especially the grand mal ones. 

This might help as well, even though the school year is coming to an end. Maybe the principal will have an assembly where the school nurse or someone else what to look for if somebody in school as a seizure.  Most kids in school don't know what to do if they see someone who has a seizure or what the side effects are.  Just run it by your parents and see what they think of the idea.

Re: Teenager Problems....

Submitted by contown on Wed, 2012-12-12 - 21:53
Sounds like you're just dealing with shitty guys. A lot of people are immature and have a lack of understanding at 15/16. 20 now, and all of the people I'm really close to know about my epilepsy and they don't really care. (In a good way) They're not scared, they get it, pretty much everyone has something. It's not your fault, it's just that some people need to grow up, and some mature more slowly than others. There are still understanding guys out there at that age. Don't blame yourself or give up because some idiots get scared off for no good reason.

Re: Teenager Problems....

Submitted by DanaO on Mon, 2012-12-17 - 02:10
First off, if guys can't look past the medical condition and see a beautiful young woman, then tell them to take a flying leap.  I am 41 and have a 17 year-old son.  He has had seizures since he was 2. Luckily for his friends and girls, they are pretty cool with it.  When he meets someone new he explains to them he has seizures.  He tells them his seizures are like a computer that has too many apps open and it locks up.  It has to shut down and reboot to get going again. My son or I then show them what to do to make sure he is safe during a seizure and they then have my number and my husband's number to call if something happens.  By being open about it and talking about it with his friends it has made things a lot easier for him.  I have never wanted him to be labeled "different" so I started teaching him at a young age not everyone is going to be nice or understand and the ones that are this way can kiss your ass. But, the ones that see you for you and not the seizures are your true friends.  I told him to always hold his head up high, answer any questions they may have, and even joke about it if necessary to lighten the mood. Once people see his confidence it seems to put them more at ease.  Good luck sweetie! You will do just fine!

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