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USB Medical Bracelets

I have recently been participating in a medical bracelet test where the actual bracelet has a USB flash drive on it which has all my medical information on it.  So, in case when I have a seizure the ems, doctors or whoever finds me can get all my medical information that they need to know about me.  I have recently been given some complaints from some people who have helped me when I had a seizure and they said they did not know the bracelet was a medical bracelet or not.  They said that they bracelet just looks like a trendy bracelet that a teenager would wear on their arm.  The letters that were on the bracelet faded off, and they bracelets comes apart really easy.  I am just wondering if anyone else is also wearing a bracelet like I have right now, and if they have been having problems with it as well.  I am a very active person too and the bracelet gets dirty really easy and there is no way to clean it either, as getting it wet would ruin the USB flash drive on there.  If anyone has any suggestions I would appreciate it.  My friends said the medical bracelet I have right now, is just not doing any good. 

Comments

Re: USB Medical Bracelets

I think the USB drive is a very cool idea. But you might find these more practical...

The Medical Alert Foundation has a necklace that's saved many lives. (Testimonials from my website.)

Medics recognize it and you can change your information, when needed. (Like if your meds change.) They also know whom to contact, especially if you end up in the hospital. The price for membership is just $30 a year. And if you have an “Advance Directive,” they will include it with your information — FREE.

Another option is the Medical Text ID which is a powerful Medical ID in case of emergency. It assigns you a unique personal identification number (PIN) that is displayed on a wallet card, key chain, sticker or snap-on device that can be worn on clothing. The PIN is linked to an online account that you can set up on their secure iB Web site. Your online account has information about who you are, what medications and allergies you have and up to ten emergency contacts.

Phylis Feiner Johnson
www.epilepsytalk.com