ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
mommy_c

epilepsy and speech - what do you do for school??

my daughter's speech is GREATLY affected by her epilepsy (due to where the seizures are taking place in her brain.)  we have gone to ASL with her although she is still in speech once a week.  this has greatly helped her communicate - praise God! 

we are looking toward pre-school years now and are not sure where she fits school wise.  her seizures are not under control and although she uses ASL - she hears and understands things perfectly.

anyone else in this situation?  what have you done school-wise?  we will not be using the computer thing that would "speak" for her.

tia!

 

 

Comments

Re: epilepsy and speech - what do you do for school??

I have only been diagnosed for a year but have had speech arrests for several.  They are a little better in that I don´t stutter very rapidly anymore thankfully. (Think people thought I was crazy or messing about.)

My big seizures are under control but I still have a kind of strangled feeling and am unable to speak, this is only occasionally compared with b4, maybe 5 times a week for maybe only a couple of seconds at a time.

As a teacher it is a problem but usually I can kind of feel it happening.  Have patience and try not to be too anxious as your girl will pick up on it, the more anxious I get the worse it gets.

Re: epilepsy and speech - what do you do for school??

My daughter is in the first grade now, but was diagnosed with epilepsy when she was in preschool. She has had speech and learning problems. She was diagnosed with left frontal with secondary genrealized, she has been seizure free since 10/07/06, due to the meds she is on. She is on Trilepital. One of the major reasons she had speech problems were due to a mucus seal on the bottom of her tongue. We had that removed, and her speech improved, but with some little problems still. She has been moved to remedial classes for reading and gets tutoring for two hours two days a week.

Re: epilepsy and speech - what do you do for school??

Actually sometims after my daughter had a seizure she would not talk. She would move her head to yes an no, but could not speak for sometimes up to five hours. One time we were in the emergency room, and had to wait for her to talk before we were released. After talking ot her doctor, she said it is due to the lac of oxygen to her brain during her seizures. Her seizures always last for longer than five minutes. We have to give her disastat through rectal to stop them.

Re: epilepsy and speech - what do you do for school??

Hi, my daughter is 5years old and is diagnosed with focal and secondary seizures since she was born. She has a speech delay and learning delay because of her siezures. She has been working with early childhood since she was 2 and half. This has really helped her. she goes to a regular preschool that offers tiny tots twice a week and also twice a week threw the early childhood speech thearpy. They have a speech therapy teacher in the room that works with all the kids and then one on one. It has really helped and also to get her ready for kindergarden!!! I also was very worried that she would be behind. She has advanced in her speech so much. So dont worry because every child is different and unique in there own way!!!! :) So as long as you as her mom stay on top of her speech and education and show that you are very concerned they are going to help you. I promise that... Also she goes once a week 30 minutes one to one with the hospital here in MN Gillette which has helped to. She is gonna do great dont worry. Best of luck to you and your daughter!! God Bless Email me with any other questions.

Re: epilepsy and speech - what do you do for school??

My 3 1/2 yr old, Missy, goes to speech therapy at a local therapy clinic 3 times a week for 20 minutes each session, along with receiving speech therapy at preschool.  She goes to a special needs preschool that we have been involved with since she was 6 months old. 

The more you work with your daughter and her speech therapist(s) the better. And try to coordinate the therapies so that they work together and not against one another.

We're slowly working on introducing ASL into her speech therapy but it is slow going because she is also developmentally delayed and does not use her hands for much other than sticking her fingers in her mouth.

I hope you're able to get connected with the right people.  Just remember, little improvements are wonderful things. God bless and good luck!

Re: epilepsy and speech - what do you do for school??

Son was tested for special ed. because of speech.  He was very intelligent other wise.  He was expressive but would not say things and would have staring szs.  Then they were under control.  He was given medications until 5th grade.  He is a junior in high school and still in special ed. to give him time to take test but his intelligence is great!  He is normal or above normal! We tried everything to take care of everything at the beginning and now a teenager and that is another story.  His speech, we are still working on because he is quiet but extremely intelligent.  I wish you luck!

Re: epilepsy and speech - what do you do for school??

  My problem is with they called word block. You know what you want to say but you can't get the word out. Sometimes it just one word or a group. Maybe it was the reason way I was allways I was allways a poor speller in school.

 

Re: epilepsy and speech - what do you do for school??

  My problem is with they called word block. You know what you want to say but you can't get the word out. Sometimes it just one word or a group. Maybe it was the reason way I was allways I was allways a poor speller in school.

 

Re: epilepsy and speech - what do you do for school??

Nice Post! I think that people should be concern and aware for thise people who have epelipsy.

Re: epilepsy and speech - what do you do for school??

My daughters speech wasn't affected when she first started school but about two and a half years ago deteriorated dramatically. She'll be 8 in January but now achieves communication at the level of a 2 year old. Her speech and language therapist said that she had single channel thought process, where she could only think about one thing at a time, and word finding difficulties. Using prompts such as pictures or saying the beginning sound of a word for her often helped. She has recently moved to a special school as she has deteriorated so much, but there they use methods to help constantly as they specialize in problems like hers and she has come on incredibly since starting there. One of the biggest problems we faced with the mainstream school was they didn't know how to deal with her and she was often frustrated and would lash out, which resulted in these incompetent teachers getting her comfy and letting her sleep all day, which in turn caused the knock on effect of her never sleeping well at night, making her tired during daytime, making everything worse. A vicious cycle caused, in my opinion, by the schools lack of care and understanding of her condition. Things can improve with the right help. I was also told by the speech therapist that by answering questions for her, instead of trying to prompt her, I wasn't helping. Oops! It took quite a while to get out of that habit but we live and learn.

Re: epilepsy and speech - what do you do for school??

It is excellent that you are willing to use sign language to help your daughter communicate.  My son also had problems with communication and I happen to be a speech-lang. pathologist...I guess God was preparing me for my future, smile.  By allowing her to develop language/communication it has been often shown that the frustration factor is reduced and working on speech for communication can be more effective.  Some kids do better with picture forms of communication, especially if there are motor issues.   The training and certification for speech/lang therapists is the same whether they work in a medical setting or educational setting...though in some states the therapist must also have a teaching license to work in the schools, so has done some additional course work for that.   There are limitations to both settings...insurance can dictate what a medical provider can do and state criteria dictates who can be served in the schools.  Your child sounds like she could qualify for both settings which is what I chose to do with my son.   They do need to communicate but not necessarily to work on the exact same goals (for example...one may take speech articulation, one may work on building language, it is all up to you and your team what is best for your individual child).  Just make sure they are not working at odds with eachother (one using sign language, one saying not to use gestures or signs).  Even though I work in the schools and my son is in an excellent school system for kids with special needs, advocating for him never ends.  We are the experts on our kids and unfortunately, even if  you have worked to educate everyone one  year...it is likely you will have to do the same every year.   They have lots of kids and I always want to make sure my son's journey is not harder than it has to be so I keep a file of handouts and include all of the general education teachers, special education teachers, administrative people and nurses in the loop.   These kinds of neurological issues can seem to some people as not as relevant to the educational issues as they are.  That is because the kids are better on some days and have trickier times on others.  They assume this means they are in more control than they are ("He did it the other day so I know he can").   I have to educate them every  year that throughout the day things change due to the seizures and other physical issues.  No one doubts this with a child who only has motor issues and is a little stronger one day than another...but it is often in question with academics and behavior.  A wonderful site for what you can expect from the school system is PACER  a parent advocacy organization that works all over the USA.

Re: epilepsy and speech - what do you do for school??

I had a meeting at my daughters school a couple of days ago and the speech and language therapist has now decided that we should start using basic sign language as a visual aid to help with her communication. So I think you are giving your daughter a brilliant head start by starting using sign language from an early age. They said that when my daughter is very anxious she can have great difficulty processing what she's hearing and having the signing to focus on aswell makes it easier to understand. Good luck, Jen

Re: epilepsy and speech - what do you do for school??

I think you should continue with speech therapy. God bless your child! Feng shui products