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william.hartman

Left hippocampus

I am new to this website, so i will introduce my self. i have had seizures for the past 29 years. My seizures are in my left hippocampus. I have always had concerns about having surgery, but Recently my doctor informed me of a new type of surgery called MRI guided laser ablation. I am considering having this done since it is not as major surgery, but I would like to be sure that the tissue they remove is not usable. Does anybody know how they can tell that I don't use any of my left hippocampus?

Comments

Re: Left hippocampus

I actually had to look up the definition of "ablation":  remove, detach, destroy...

I could be very mistaken, but I believe there could be scar tissue on the hippocampus. That could hopefully be removed.  Many people with temporal lobe epilepsy have the problem of a reduced hippocampus...causing memory, reasoning, cognitive problems, etc.

If I thought my problem could be cured with surgery, I would not care how any excess tissue would be used.

Good luck and keep us informed. 

Re: Left hippocampus

Thanks for your reply.  I just got back from the hospital yesterday.  So far, the results are very good.  I haven't had any seizures or auras since the surgery.  I have never had a day without auras for the past 29 years so this is amazing. My memory is just as good as it was before the surgery:)  The one side affect that I wasn't expecting is that my emotions are like a roller coaster.  I usually have steady emotions, but now the simplest things like my wife telling me she loves me can make me cry.  The doctor said this was a possible temporary side effect, but I didn't expect it to be this wild.

I thank God for this amazing new technology and some amazing doctors who really do care for their patients.

 

Drew

Re: Left hippocampus

CONGRATULATIONS!

Maybe try to let others know about the success.

Re: Left hippocampus

Please let everyone know about the success!  I was horrified for years but now I'm ready to roll!

Re: Left hippocampus

From my understanding, the only way to know is to get tested. Every brain is different, so what could cure one, could be disasterous to the other. That's why they need do so many tests to find out exactly how much tissue is involved, the exact location, how close it is to other senses (speach, memory, emotions, etc.) in order to know if you're even a candidate. I just decided to undergo surgery myself. I was told there will be several tests and the actual surgery probably would be close to 6 months to a year from the initial test. It's frightening, but you have us.